Regulating the New Self-Employed in the Uber Economy: What Role for Competition Law?

Seminar/Forum

Regulating the New Self-Employed in the Uber Economy: What Role for Competition Law?

Precarious independent contractors, gig workers, Uber drivers and crowdworkers are topics of discussion in the labour law scholarship all over the world, but the application of the competition rules to freelancers is much less often debated. However, competition law is relevant not least of all because the cartel prohibition can and has been used to bar self-employed workers from collective bargaining. This presentation discusses the role that competition law can play in regulating the so called ‘new self-employed’ – precarious workers who are de jure considered to be micro-enterprises. Specific attention is paid to the newest type of ‘new self-employed’, namely those engaged for ‘on-demand’ work via matchmaking platforms like Uber or Amazon’s Mechanical Turk. The presentation aims to canvas the different types of regulatory instruments available to address exploitation concerns in the context of the Uber economy and discusses the role that competition law can play in the design of a regulatory regime.

Presenter

  • Dr Victoria Daskalova
    Dr Victoria Daskalova, University of Twente