Current Grants

Current Research Grants

Members of the ALC are currently undertaking research on the following projects:

ALC Member(s)Year(s)Type of Grant TitleCollaborator(s)Amount
Ying Liew2019MLS Research Excellence Grant‘Asia-Pacific Trusts Law: Modern Issues in Theory and Practice’ ConferenceMatthew HardingA$10,000
Ying Liew2019MLS Research Grant Seed Funds‘Asia-Pacific Trusts Law: Modern Issues in Theory and Practice’ ConferenceMatthew HardingA$5,000
Tim Lindsey2019University of Melbourne Award for Excellence in Engagement - Public Value  A$10,000
Pip Nicholson2019Human Rights and Treaty Bodies Section, Human Rights Branch, Department of Foreign Affairs and TradeDeath Penalty Litigation Study Tour A$27,661
Tarun Khaitan2018Oxford-MLS Research PartnershipThe Methodology of Special/Particular JurisprudenceSandy Steel 
Pip Nicholson2018-2019Australia Government: Department of Education and Training2018 Endeavour Mobility Grant Program A$21,500
Amanda Whiting2018Hong Kong General Research Fund'Investigating the Professional Identity of Hong Kong Solicitors: A qualitative perspective'Karen Lee Man Yee (The Education University of Hong Kong)HK$441,000
Tarun Khaitan2018-2020ARC Future Fellowship'Constitutional resilience in South Asian democracies' A$988,852
Andrew Godwin & Stacey Steele20172018-2019 Renmin-MLS Research Partnership‘Chinese insolvency law and practice from a technology perspective: Fintech and the National Bankrupt Enterprise Reorganisation Cases Information Platform’Dong Yang (Renmin University, People's Republic of China)A$20,000
Stacey Steele2017MLS International Collaboration Fund'Directors' Liability for Insolvent Trading in Australia: Reflections on Recent Reforms from Experience in Singapore and Japan'Ian RamsayA$9,110
Tim Lindsey2016-2018ARC Discovery Award'Islam, Law and the State in the Philippines'Kerstin Steiner (La Trobe University)
M.B. Hooker
A$200,100
Farrah Ahmed2015-2018ARC Discovery Grant'The Response of Australian Family Law to Islamic Community Processes'Carolyn Evans
Ghena Krayem
Helen Rhoades
A$329,900
Sarah Biddulph (Head of China team) 2009 - currentMajor Collaborative Research Initiative (MCRI) funded by the Canadian Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC)'Asia Pacific Dispute Resolution: Understanding Coordinated Compliance with International Trade and Human Rights Standards in Comparative Perspective'Pitman Potter (University of British Columbia)CA$2.5 million (for entire project)

Islam, Law and the State in the Philippines

ARC Discovery Award, 2016-2018

Tim Lindsey, Kerstin Steiner (Monash) and M.B. Hooker

Using the Philippines as a case study, the project plans to offer insights into a question that is of global significance but also of direct relevance to Australia: how Muslim minorities use sharĂ®'a in their search for legitimacy and identity and the role of conflict in that process. It also plans to explore their opposition to the legal systems of modern nation states. The project aims to provide a thorough contemporary description of both the state system for the application of Islamic law in the Philippines and alternative systems developed by Muslim minorities who have used violence in their efforts to secede from that state, and have threatened regional security.

Asia Pacific Dispute Resolution: Understanding Coordinated Compliance with International Trade and Human Rights Standards in Comparative Perspective

Major Collaborative Research Initiative (MCRI) funded by the Canadian Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), 2009-current

Sarah Biddulph (Head of China Team), Pitman Potter (UBC)

This Phase Two MCRI project over seven years involves an important expansion of Phase One work (SSHRC-MCRI funded grant on Asia Pacific Disputes Resolution: Cross-cultural and Comparative Disputes Resolution Research). It applies the paradigms of Selective Adaptation and Institutional Capacity to the critically important issue of coordinated compliance with international trade and human rights standards. Based on new data derived from archival, interview, and Case Study sources in Canada, China, Japan, India and Indonesia, the project will test a range of hypotheses in order to develop an explanatory and predictive model that supports forecasting of coordinated trade and human rights compliance at local levels in Canada and Asia.