Mr Murtaza Mohiqi



Murtaza Mohiqi

Banning Girls' Education by the Taliban: Religious Justification, or Tribal Culture?

I am a legal researcher and lawyer with experience in human rights as well as private law, at both the domestic and international level. My research focuses on human rights of specific groups (women, children, minorities, immigrant, persons with disabilities…) in their constitutional, international, and global dimensions. Another strand of my research deals with Artificial Intelligence and human rights. My writings examine emerging technologies through the lenses of law, especially human rights law. I am also a Legal Tech Specialist, curious about how Tech can be used to promote human rights, peace.

Banning Girls' Education by the Taliban: Religious Justification, or Tribal Culture?

Afghanistan is the only country in the world that forbids girls to go to school. No clear reason or justification are offered by the Taliban authorities for denying the women and girls their very basic human right to education. Prominent individual scholars argue that there is no mention in the Quran or prophetic sayings that justifies such action by the Taliban. Some religious researchers believe that the Taliban used girls’ education as leverage to gain recognition and legitimization. Also, there is the idea that the Taliban leader's opposition to girls' education might be shaped by Afghanistan's patriarchal tribal traditions. Afghanistan remains a largely rural and conservative society in which the new generation, particularly girls, are expected to remain secluded.