Wednesday 24 April 2019

About the seminar

How do conversations shift as the understanding of sources of law shifts both within settler states and internationally? What might the implications be in a world where lies can be proclaimed as truth and truth denounced as lies?

This presentation explores possibilities within the material turn to reengage in reconciling relationships between Indigenous Peoples and settler states though the examination of treaty-making and the construction of settler state legal narratives.

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About the presenter

Jeffery Hewitt (Cree) is an Assistant Professor at the University of Windsor, Faculty of Law. His research interests include Indigenous legal orders and governance, constitutional and administrative law, human rights and remedies, business law, art and law. He teaches constitutional law.

Professor Hewitt has served as Visiting Scholar and McMurtry Fellow at Osgoode Hall Law School, York University as well as adjunct faculty at both Osgoode Hall Law School and the University of Toronto, Faculty of Law; was the 2015 Charles D. Gonthier Fellowship from the Canadian Institute for the Administration of Justice; and a 2013/14 McMurtry Fellow at Osgoode Hall Law School examining the relationship between Indigenous art and law; is past-President of the Indigenous Bar Association of Canada; and since 2002 served as General Counsel to Rama First Nation during which time General Counsel’s office received a 2011 Canadian General Counsel Award for Social Responsibility for work with First Nation Elders and youth.

Professor Hewitt holds an LLB and LLM from Osgoode Hall Law School and is called to the Bar in the Province of Ontario (since 1998); has served on various boards, including Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto; and is currently on the executive of Legal Leaders for Diversity. Professor Hewitt has delivered numerous guest lectures at law schools as well as to both the judiciary and the legal profession in his areas of research.