Anjalee De Silva

  • Anjalee de Silva

    PhD candidate

-->

Anjalee de Silva is a PhD Candidate at Melbourne Law School at the University of Melbourne. Her research interests include public law, discrimination law, free speech and media law, and critical legal theories. Her thesis examines significant manifestations of vilifying speech directed at and about women, as well as the role of law in deterring, regulating, and mitigating such speech. It considers, in particular, whether analogous theoretical, empirical, and/or doctrinal arguments apply to the inclusion of gender as a legal category of vilification as they do to other legal categories of vilification, such as race.

Anjalee has also held the roles of Honorary Fellow (Melbourne JD) and Teaching Fellow at Melbourne Law School. She has previously taught Administrative Law and Free Speech and Media Law in Melbourne Law School's Juris Doctor and Breadth programs respectively.

She holds a Bachelor of Laws with first class honours and a Bachelor of Arts (Media and Communications) from the University of Melbourne. Prior to joining Melbourne Law School, she practised as a solicitor in London, Hong Kong, and Melbourne, during which time she represented and advised a range of commercial and pro bono clients.

Thesis Title


Sticks, stones, and sex: Addressing the gender gap in Australian anti-vilification legislation

Thesis Summary


Certain categories of vilification, or ‘hate speech,’ including, in particular, racial vilification, are recognised as legal wrongs in many liberal democracies, including Australia. That is not the case for gendered vilification. Nor has the issue of gendered vilification received much scholarly or policy attention. This thesis will examine significant manifestations of vilifying speech directed at and about women on the basis of their gender, as well as the role of law in deterring, regulating, and mitigating such speech. In particular, this thesis will consider whether analogous theoretical, empirical and/or doctrinal arguments apply to the inclusion of gender as a category of vilification under Australian anti-vilification laws as they do to other legal categories of vilification, such as race.

Supervisors

  • Administrative/public law
  • Critical race theory
  • Discrimination law
  • Feminist legal theory
  • Free speech law
  • Media and Communications law