Georgina Dimopoulos

  • Georgina Dimopoulos

    PhD candidate

Georgina Dimopoulos is a PhD candidate and Teaching Fellow at Melbourne Law School. She researches across the areas of family law, children’s rights and privacy. Georgina’s PhD research adopts a children’s rights approach to develop a normative understanding of the meaning and value of privacy in proceedings under the Family Law Act 1975 (Cth) involving children, using the exercise of the Family Court of Australia’s welfare jurisdiction in gender dysphoria proceedings as a case study.

Georgina holds a Bachelor of Laws (First Class Honours) and a Bachelor of Arts (Media and Communications) from the University of Melbourne. She was admitted to legal practice in 2010 and practised at Allens Arthur Robinson (now Allens Linklaters) in Commercial Litigation and Dispute Resolution and in Mergers and Acquisitions. Georgina has worked as Senior Associate to the Honourable Justice Emilios Kyrou at the Supreme Court of Victoria, and as a Senior Legal Policy Officer in the Civil Justice Division of the Victorian Department of Justice and Regulation. She has also been engaged as a legal consultant to the Victorian Family Law Pathways Network and Women with Disabilities Victoria, and as a research assistant to academics at the Melbourne Law School and the Melbourne School of Government. Georgina is currently an International Editor of the Cambridge Law Review.

Thesis Title


Conceptualising and justifying privacy in proceedings under the Family Law Act 1975 (Cth): the case of Re Jamie

Thesis Summary


This thesis adopts a children’s rights approach to develop a normative understanding of the meaning and value of privacy in proceedings under the Family Law Act 1975 (Cth). It uses as a case study the Family Court of Australia’s exercise of its welfare jurisdiction under section 67ZC of the Family Law Act in cases involving medical treatment for children and young people diagnosed with gender dysphoria. This thesis aims to show that the calibration of children’s rights, parental responsibilities, and state duties in relation to children’s best interests and welfare in proceedings under the Family Law Act lies at the core of understanding the notion of children’s decisional privacy, and critiquing the extent to which children are, can be, and should be, recognised as rights-bearing subjects before the law.

Supervisors

  • Family Law
  • Children's Rights
  • Human Rights Law
  • Privacy Law
  • Legal Theory
  • Civil Practice and Procedure
  • Litigation