2017 Visting Fellows



  • Dr Ester Bodnár
    Eszter Bodnár
    Dr Eszter Bodnár

    Eszter Bodnár is a Kathleen Fitzpatrick Visiting Fellow with the ARC Laureate Project in Comparative Constitutional Law. Her research interest is in comparative constitutional law, international human rights, and European constitutional law. She has been an assistant professor at the Faculty of Law of University Eötvös Loránd (ELTE) in Budapest, Hungary since 2013. She is also a faculty member in the Master of Electoral Policy and Administration program of Scoula Sant’Anna, Pisa. In the last years, she has been teaching and researching in Germany, France, the United States, the Czech Republic, Portugal, Italy, and Canada. She graduated as a lawyer and worked at the Department of Constitutional Law in the Hungarian Ministry of Justice, and in the Hungarian National Election Office. She obtained her PhD degree in constitutional law at ELTE in 2013 with her thesis on the fundamental right attributes and restrictions of the right to vote that was published in Hungarian (HVG-Orac, 2014). Currently she is working on a comparative constitutional law project on open justice, seeking the answer on how the courts should answer the challenges of the 21st century in a constitutional way.

  • Ms Gisela Ferrari
    Gisela Ferrari
    Ms Gisela Ferrari

    Gisela Ferrari is a Kathleen Fitzpatrick Visiting Fellow with the ARC Laureate Project in Comparative Constitutional Law. Gisela is a doctoral student at the Catholic University of Argentina, in Buenos Aires. She is currently studying the influence of the European Court of Human Rights on the Argentine Supreme Court. Her research interests are in human rights law, public international law, and constitutional law, especially cross-jurisdictional constitutional interactions. Gisela is a Lecturer at the Catholic University of Argentina and at Universidad Austral, where she teaches constitutional law and human rights law. Earlier in 2017, she was a guest researcher at the Max Planck Institute for European Legal History in Frankfurt. Previously, Gisela was at the London School of Economics and Political Science, where she completed an LL.M. in Public Law. As part of the fellowship program, she is currently working on a paper on successful constitutionalism and the reshaping of cultural and social understandings of race in Argentina.

  • Dr Caitlin Goss
    Dr Caitlin Goss
    Dr Caitlin Goss

    Caitlin Goss is a Kathleen Fitzpatrick Visiting Fellow with the ARC Laureate Project in Comparative Constitutional Law. Her research interests are in comparative constitutional law, international law, and evidentiary issues in constitutional and international law. Caitlin is currently working on a monograph on interim—or deliberately temporary—constitutions, and the ways in which they affect the long-term constitutional law of the states in which they are adopted. Caitlin is a Lecturer in Law at the University of Queensland, where she teaches in constitutional law, public international law, and the law of evidence.  Previously, Caitlin was at the University of Oxford, where she read for the Bachelor of Civil Law and the DPhil in Law, and served as the Graduate Teaching Assistant in Public International Law.

  • Ms Swati Jhaveri
    Swati Jhaveri
    Ms Swati Jhaveri

    Swati Jhaveri is a Kathleen Fitzpatrick Visiting Fellow with the ARC Laureate Project in Comparative Constitutional Law. Swati is an Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Law at the National University of Singapore. Her areas of research are constitutional and administrative law, with a focus on Asian jurisdictions. Swati previously taught at the Faculty of Law at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. She obtained her Bachelor of Arts in Jurisprudence (First Class Honours) and Bachelor of Civil Law (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. Swati previously practised law at Allen & Overy, specialising in international commercial arbitration and is a Solicitor of the Hong Kong SAR and England & Wales and a Member of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators.   Swati is currently working on papers looking at the need for more comparison in the field of administrative law; and the role of the executive (as opposed to courts and parliament) in generating constitutional norms and meaning.

  • Ms Dani Larkin
    Dani Larkin
    Ms Dani Larkin

    Dani Larkin is a Kathleen Fitzpatrick Visiting Fellow with the ARC Laureate Project in Comparative Constitutional Law. Dani is a Doctoral student at Bond University located in Queensland, Australia. Her field of research examines the importance of protecting Indigenous cultural identity through self-determination and political participation. Dani is an Indigenous woman with connections to the Kungarakany tribe located in the Northern Territory and Bundjalung tribe from northern New South Wales. Dani has completed a Bachelor of Laws degree from Griffith University and a Masters of Laws Specialist degree in Corporate and Commercial Law and Pactice from Bond University. She is an admitted legal practitioner with several years experience working as a lawyer for a number of government agencies, including with the Australian Federal Police, the A.C.T Department of Public Prosecutions, the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Service, and the Australian Tax Office and now wishes to use her skills, knowledge and experience to advocate for Indigenous Peoples in Australia.

  • Dr Jaclyn Neo
    Jaclyn Neo
    Dr Jaclyn L. Neo

    Jaclyn L. Neo is an Assistant Professor of Law at the National University of Singapore (NUS). She specializes in constitutional law and human rights. She was a recipient of two graduate scholarships from NUS under which she completed her Masters of Law (LL.M.) and Doctor of the Science of Law (J.S.D.) at Yale Law School.

    Jaclyn is an Executive Committee member of the NUS Centre for Asian Legal Studies and was also recently appointed to the editorial boards of the Asian Journal of Comparative Law and the Asian Yearbook of International Law.

    Jaclyn is the sole editor of a recently published volume on Constitutional Interpretation in Singapore: Theory and Practice (Routledge, 2017). Her articles have been published in the International Journal of Constitutional Law (I-CON), Oxford Journal of Law and Religion, Human Rights Quarterly, and the Singapore Journal of Legal Studies. Her article on domestic incorporation of international human rights law in a dualist state won the Asian Yearbook of International Law’s DILA International Law Prize. She was also recently awarded the 2016 SHAPE-SEA Research Award in recognition of her research on human rights, especially religious freedom, in Southeast Asia.

  • Dr Jenna Sapiano
    Dr Jenna Sapiano
    Dr Jenna Sapiano

    Jenna Sapiano is a Kathleen Fitzpatrick Visiting Fellow with the ARC Laureate Project in Comparative Constitutional Law. Jenna is an Associate Fellow in the Centre for Global Constitutionalism at the University of St Andrews in Scotland. She completed her PhD at the School of International Relations at the University of St Andrews on peace agreements and constitutions. In 2013, she was awarded a two-year Economic and Social Research Council grant. Previously, Jenna was at the University of Edinburgh, where she completed an MSc in African Studies and an LLM in International Law. She holds a BA from McGill University (Montreal, Canada).She has worked with the International Institute for Development and Electoral Assistance and the Political Settlements Research Programme (University of Edinburgh). Jenna was the convenor in 2015-16 of the Edinburgh Constitutional Law Discussion Group. She is currently working on a paper on constitutional silences as part of the fellowship program.