Associate Professor Jeannie Paterson

Overview

Jeannie Marie Paterson teaches and researches in the areas of contracts, consumer protection and consumer credit law, as well as the role of technological change in these contexts.

Jeannie’s research covers three inter-related themes:

  1. Support for consumers experiencing hardship, marginalisation or vulnerability,
  2. The impact and potential of AI and automation on consumer decision making and choice, and
  3. Legislative design, including the relationship between general law and statutory standards and soft law and co-regulation options.

Jeannie completed her BA/LLB (Hons) at ANU and her PhD at Monash University. She previously lectured at the Faculty of Law at Monash University and, prior to that time, was a solicitor at Mallesons Stephen Jaques (now King & Wood Mallesons).

Jeannie is the co-author (with Andrew Robertson and Arlen Duke) of Principles of Contract Law (5th ed, 2015) and has written extensively on contract and consumer law. She currently co-teaches New Technology Law (with Cam Whittfield) in the JD and Australian Consumer Law (with Hal Bolitho) in the MLM, along with Legal Method & Reasoning in the JD.

With Elise Bant, Jeannie holds ARC Discovery Grants for projects on 'Remedies in Common Law and Under Statute for Misleading Conduct' and on 'A Coherent Law of Misleading Conduct'.

Jeannie is also involved with several ongoing research and advocacy projects on consumer rights, including with the Melbourne Social Equity Institute, the Networked Society Institute, the Australian Communications Consumers Action Network, the Consumer Action Law Centre and West Justice.

Jeannie is the co-coordinator of the Digital Citizens Research Network at MLS and, with Dr Andrea Cook, leads the Universal Access and Design Research Program at the Melbourne Social Equity Institute.

Teaching

The Melbourne JD

Melbourne Law Masters

Other School and University Responsibilities

  • Co-coordinator of the Digital Citizens Research Network at MLS
  • Co-leader of the Universal Access and Design Research Program at the Melbourne Social Equity Institute