Global PhDs on Statelessness (GPS)

Meet the Global PhDs on Statelessness Network

The Peter McMullin Centre on Statelessness is delighted to host the Global PhDs on Statelessness (GPS) webpage, showcasing the exciting and varied emerging approaches to statelessness research. GPS is a network of PhD students and Doctoral researchers engaged on issues of citizenship and statelessness around the world. The network was set up by participants of the inaugural PhD Workshop on Citizenship and Statelessness hosted by Tilburg University in October 2018.

Through the network’s mailing list, PhD students and Doctoral researchers can stay up-to-date on events, news and engage in peer-support, please subscribe at http://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/STATELESSNESSPHDS.

The GPS webpage is updated biannually. If you would like to have your work featured please contact Deirdre Brennan.

  • Haqqi Bahram
    Linkoping University

    Becoming a Citizen – Does it End There? An Intersectional Exploration of Statelessness Legacy, Forced Migration and Identity

    haqqi.bahram@liu.se

  • Katalin Berenyi
    National University of Public Service

    Mapping Stateless Minorities' Vulnerability to Mass Atrocities and Radicalization

    berenyikatalin@hotmail.com

  • Deirdre Brennan
    University of Melbourne

    Campaigning for citizenship in Nepal (2006 – 2019): Assessing how activism impacts upon law reform and the public perception of the stateless

    debrennan@student.unimelb.edu.au

  • Natalie Brinham
    Queen Mary University of London

    The slow and ongoing production of Rohingya statelessness in Myanmar

    n.j.brinham@qmul.ac.uk

  • Jing-Han Chen
    University of Edinburgh

    The Statelessness Issue in Taiwan:  A Comparison of the Statelessness of Tibetan Refugees in Taiwan and Overseas Taiwanese People

    jing-han.chen@ed.ac.uk

  • Eleanor Cotterill
    Swansea University

    Experiences of Statelessness in the UK (working title)

    eleanor.cotterill@swansea.ac.uk

  • Yuriko Cowper Smith
    Yuriko Cowper-Smith
    University of Guelph

    Rohingya Migrants’ Political Activism in Canada – A Complex Explanatory Model

    email address to come

  • Sangita Jaghai Bajulaiye
    Tilburg University

    Denationalization (working title)

    s.jaghai@tilburguniversity.edu

  • Kaveri Urmilesh
    Tata Institute of Social Sciences

    Interrogating Statelessness, Human Rights and Inclusion: A Study of Rohingyas in India (Working title)

    kaveri.urmilesh2014@tiss.edu

  • Thomas McGee
    University of Melbourne

    The Displacement-Statelessness Nexus – Syrians in Limbo

    thomas.mcgee@cantab.net

  • Yesim Mutlu
    Middle East Technical University

    Disowning Citizens: Arbitrary Revocation of Citizenship and Statelessness in the Paternalist Turkish State

    yesimutlu@gmail.com

  • Allison Petrozziello
    Wilfrid Laurier University

    Stateless at Birth? Upholding the Human Right to a Nationality for Migrant Women’s Children

    apetrozziello@balsillieschool.ca

  • Maria Jose Recalde-Vela
    Tilburg University

    Statelessness and Decolonial Perspectives (working title)

    m.j.recalde-vela@uvt.nl

  • Victoria Reitter
    University of Salzburg

    On the Production of Statelessness

    victoria.reitter@sbg.ac.at

  • Jade Roberts
    University of Melbourne

    Beyond the State: An Individual Rights Approach to Recognising and Protecting the Rights of Stateless People

    jade.roberts@unimelb.edu.au

  • Barbara von Rütte
    University of Bern

    The Human Right to Citizenship. From State Privilege to Individual Right

    barbara.vonruette@oefre.unibe.ch

  • Katherine G. Southwick
    National University of Singapore

    Theorizing Rule of Law for Ethnically Divided Societies

    katherine.southwick@gmail.com

  • Caia Vliecks
    Tilburg University

    European statelessness: Nationality and the reduction of statelessness in Europe (working title)

    c.vlieks@tilburguniversity.edu

  • Ashley Walters
    University of Connecticut

    Experiences of Migrants to the United States in a Time of Heightened Anti-Immigrant Rhetoric (An Ethnographic Study)

    ashley.walters@uconn.edu